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Energy Globe Award

With more than 170 participating countries and over 1500 project submissions annually the Energy Globe Award is today's most prestigious environmental prize worldwide. It distinguishes projects regionally, nationally and globally that conserve resources such as energy or utilize renewable or emission-free sources. Award ceremonies are held all over the world. Prominent personalities as well as Energy Globe Ambassadors in 90 countries support the mission of Energy Globe. The activities of Energy Globe attract worldwide media attention - international TV stations report each year with approximately 1,000 hours of broadcasting time. The aim of the Energy Globe is to raise global attention on sustainable, everywhere applicable environmental solutions and to motivate people to also become active in this area.

National ENERGY GLOBE Award 2015

Submitted by: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre
Clean drinking water for Bequia

Bequia is the largest of the Grenadines islands, approximately 7 square miles in size, with a population of 4,874. Due to its size and geology, the island has no surface water and no known underground source. Approximately 30% of the island is covered with scrub vegetation of no market significance. Given the absence of surface water and the calciferous nature of the soil, fresh water resources are a major issue for Bequia. Moreover, the sea level rise is threatening coastal aquifers through saline intrusion. Both factors are threatening the water supply stability for already stressed populations, which in turn leads to over-exploitation of aquifers and natural resources, endangering the fragile ecosystems and associated biodiversity. Bequia’s ecological system is very vulnerable and very sensitive to climate change impacts. At the moment, its power station is powered by fossil fuel which is being sea-transported. A majority of Bequia’s population depends on rain-water harvesting, which is why many home constructions begin with building a water reservoir, adding between 30-40% more to the total construction costs. The pilot project was aimed at exploring an integrated, ecological approach to climate change through the implementation of adaptation measures to address the absence of freshwater in Bequia. In the end, a renewable, carbon-free energy generation source (photovoltaic system) was built with a reverse osmosis desalination plant whose input is inexhaustible sea water. The water production and distribution system includes a permeate tank with a 16.000 liters capacity, plus a water storage and distribution tank with a 90.000 liters capacity. Through the implementation of this project it was possible to secure clean drinking water for more than 1,000 people in the community, besides avoiding the equivalent of 104 tons CO2 per year, which would have been generated through the diesel generator which would have powered the reverse osmosis system. It was also possible to keep the fossil fuel transportation at the same level, avoiding the additional risk of oil spills in this vulnerable environment. Furthermore, the building costs of houses were reduced by 30%.



Water is life and must therefore always be available in sufficient quantity and good quality for the people of the world.

Personn Henrik

Jury-Rating
Bequia is the largest of the Grenadines islands and due to its size and geology, the island has no surface water and no known underground source. The sea level rise is threatening coastal aquifers through saline intrusion. Aquifers and natural resources are being exploited, endangering the fragile ecosystems and associated biodiversity. This year´s National Winner of the Energy Globe Award in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines provides clean drinking water for more than 1,000 by building a reverse osmosis desalination plant whose input is inexhaustible sea water, generating renewable, carbon-free energy. Congratulations to your achievements!