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Energy Globe Award

With more than 170 participating countries and over 1500 project submissions annually the Energy Globe Award is today's most prestigious environmental prize worldwide. It distinguishes projects regionally, nationally and globally that conserve resources such as energy or utilize renewable or emission-free sources. Award ceremonies are held all over the world. Prominent personalities as well as Energy Globe Ambassadors in 90 countries support the mission of Energy Globe. The activities of Energy Globe attract worldwide media attention - international TV stations report each year with approximately 1,000 hours of broadcasting time. The aim of the Energy Globe is to raise global attention on sustainable, everywhere applicable environmental solutions and to motivate people to also become active in this area.

National ENERGY GLOBE Award 2015

Submitted by: FUNDACION SAN CRISANTO A.C.
Mangrove restoration project

Before 1995, San Crisanto’s ecosystem had become seriously deteriorated, particularly by reduced hydrological flow through the mangrove. Up until the 1970s and 1980s the area had been home to migratory birds, fresh water fish species, crocodiles, turtles and numerous crustaceans, among others. Loss of the mangrove ecosystem resources was gradual, but eventually hydrological flows had diminished by 90%, impacting all dependent animal species. The primary cause of the decrease in flow was the construction of a highway across the wetlands, but without the drains, conduits and bridges required to maintain free water circulation in natural channels. The highway functioned as a dike, causing sedimentation of channels and natural sink holes. Natural meteorological events have also played their part. In 1988, Hurricane Gilbert destroyed large swaths of the Yucatan coast, including San Crisanto, and in 2002, Hurricane Isidore added further impacts (for example, almost total loss of mangrove cover). Finally, human beings contributed directly through harvesting of mangrove wood and disposal of domestic waste in the mangrove, and indirectly through their unawareness of the environmental services the mangrove ecosystem provides. Consciousness of this deterioration, and local residents’ love of their environment, led to interest in restoring the mangrove’s natural hydrology and preserving the ecosystem. Over a twenty-year period, San Crisanto has worked to improve its social and environmental well-being through a series of actions implemented at the community level by its members. The mangrove’s natural hydrology was restored by cleaning 11,300 m of canals and 40 natural sink holes, and maintaining them annually. Environmental study and evaluation was done of 850 hectares of mangrove, including an on-going study of its primary predator, the crocodile, during which 190 specimens have been marked to date. In addition to acknowledging traditional uses such as wood harvesting and salt extraction, others such as coconut cultivation have received renewed support, and new activities such as ecotourism have been developed (12,000 paid visits annually since 2000). Environmental education has become a constant in the community since begun in 2002, with at least one workshop offered annually. Project-related improvements in community quality of life include 25 direct and 42 indirect jobs, as well as parallel development in response to increased tourism.



Conserving biodiversity means guaranteeing human life.

Loria Palma Jose Ines

Jury-Rating
Before 1995, San Crisanto’s ecosystem had become seriously deteriorated, particularly by reduced hydrological flow through the mangroves. Up until the 1970s and 1980s the area had been home to migratory birds, fresh water fish species, crocodiles, turtles and numerous crustaceans, among others. Loss of the mangrove ecosystem resources was gradual, but eventually hydrological flows had diminished by 90%, impacting all dependent animal species. This year´s National Winner of the Energy Globe Award in Mexico has worked to restore its mangrove ecosystem by cleaning and maintaining canals and natural sink holes, doing environmental studies and offering workshops. Congratulations to your achievements!