CATEGORY "Water"

Energy Globe World Award 2019

Category:

winner

NGO Dar Si Hmad for Development, Education and Culture
With the project:
Drinking the Clouds: A Fog Collection Initiative in Southern Morocco

Morocco

The NGO Dar Si Hmad for Development, Education and culture implemented the largest fog-collection project in the world. Safe and clean potable fog-water is delivered to previously water-starved, poor, marginalized rural Berber communities of the Sahara bordering Anti-Atlas mountains in Morocco.

INITIAL SITUATION

This region on the edge of the Sahara is the most water-scarce region of the world: 78% of the land are desert or semi-arid, droughts are increasing in intensity, frequency and duration, desiccating the water supply. Prior to fog-water delivery to households, Berber women bore the laborious task of carrying water from distant wells. During the peak dry seasons, water used to be bought and delivered in water-trucks depleting already fragile revenues of these households.

SOLUTION

The project involves communities actively in the fog collection technology. Through building the largest fog collecting station in the world with a current mean water yield of 34,000 l/ day, the NGO Dar Si Hmad for Development, Education and Culture transformed the lives of entire villages, but particular ly that of women and girls, who spent around 3.5 hours a day to fetch water.

INNOVATION

The CloudFisher is highly efficient, wind-resistant, and requires little maintenance. It is the embodiment of the fundamental principles of sound engineering. Its robust experimental design allows data collection, stateof-the-art modeling, real-scale prototyping, on-site implementation and honest evaluation. It does not only address structural limitations of previous designs but has dramatically increased the overall water yield of the system through intelligent development of 3D fog nets.

finalist

ITA Group of Companies
With the project:
Desalination of Seawater to potable using Wind Power in the Island of Milos

Greece

The Seawater Reverse Osmosis desalination plant with a nominal capacity of 4.500 m3/day is a state-of-the-art seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant. The plant is located at an old bentonite clay mine on the island of Milos. It produces high quality potable water, in accordance with EU legislation.

INITIAL SITUATION

Until 2007, when the seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant was inaugurated, the island of Milos used poor quality water, brackish and corrosive, coming exclusively from drilling, mixed with expensive water that reached the island. The cost of transporting the water to meet the island‘s needs was around € 12 per cubic meter which equals approximately 5 million € yearly. Now, it is only a fifth of that cost.

SOLUTION

The project led to the complete substitution of drinking water transported in tanker ships or pumped from local wells, which was of very poor quality and scarce availability. The technology used for the project is that of reverse osmosis which requires only the electricity. The combination of the desalination plant with the wind turbine leads to optimal results for the island environment and the inhabitants of Milos, leading the way down the path of sustainable development.

INNOVATION

This technology involves reverse osmosis seawater desalination as a more environmentally friendly and cost-effective option compared to other water desalination technologies. It is the first CO2-neutral desalination project in Greece that does not burden the electric load of the local power network and the local thermal power production plant. It is also the first desalination plant in Greece located after a special architectural survey, in order to minimize any negative effects to the landscape as far as visual intrusion is concerned.

finalist

Association for Humanitarian Development (AHD)
With the project:
Access to safe and clean Drinking Water via AHD Nadi Filter

Pakistan

8,000 direct beneficiaries now have access to safe and clean drinking water at their door step. Their health and quality of life has been improved since the introduction of filters which leave dirty water clean. The project helps to eradicate endemic poverty, strengthen communities‘ resilience and expand socio-economic development options of the local population.

INITIAL SITUATION

The rural areas of Sindh Pakistan communities had to use contaminated canal water for drinking purposes. About 70% of the rural communities in Pakistan are still drinking contaminated water. The health of small children and mothers was often affected since they had to rely on dirty water. The majority of the population of both districts had only limited access to safe drinking water and sanitation services.

SOLUTION

The AHD Nadi Filter Unit is a cheap and reliable source of safe water which has contributed to the provision of safe drinking water to the community. Local villagers now have an opportunity to access facilities of safe and clean drinking water through this project. This community based solution model helps the communities and villagers by protecting them from water borne and stomach diseases, eliminating up to 99% of the bacteria and viruses in water, removing biological contamination from the water and improving the water quality.

INNOVATION

The AHD Nadi filter innovation is made from locally sourced material available in the rural areas and communities around the town. The positive and sustainable impacts of the filter can be seen in the communities of Sindh and Pakistan. The local communities promote the use of this technology at household level.

finalist

Alternative Indigenous Development Foundation, Inc. (AIDFI)
With the project:
The AIDFI Hydram pumping drinking and irrigation water uphill through a holistic approach

Philippines

The Hydram is an automatic device which pumps 24/7 an increased amount of water (up to ten times compared to what is carried manually) from lower situated sources to higher elevated waterless communities and farms using hydropower (energy contained in falling water). For farms, the Hydram provides irrigation water at no operational cost and can help a crop to survive sudden dry periods caused by climate change, add a crop or help a farmer diversify.

INITIAL SITUATION

In the Philippines, half of the land is mountainous. 20 million Filipinos are living in these mountainous areas of which 10 million are engaged in agriculture. Local problems are erosion, lacking irrigation, low productivity and migration to cities and slums. Irrigation is absent because the motorized pumps need expensive fuel and the cost of transporting this fuel to the mountains is high.

SOLUTION

The Hydram is a device which can pump water from low areas to higher areas. The main objective of the Hydram program is to bring water around the clock closer to the houses and farms of the beneficiaries and by these means improve or rather completely change their lives. Through the formation of water associations and training of local technicians these systems are sustainable and the beneficiaries proud and empowered.

INNOVATION

The pump was developed as a crossbreed model between oversized expensive imported models and the inferior DIY models. The result is a perfectly working model based on locally available materials and spare parts. It only costs 10% of the costs of imported units with the same capacity and efficiency. In a later step, a miniature model was developed which became the smallest ram pump in the world with all parts fitting in a camera box and which has been used in demos to demystify the technology in many countries.